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dc.contributorFacultad de Ciencias Biologicas y Ambientaleses_ES
dc.contributor.authorGarcía Llamas, Paula
dc.contributor.authorSuárez Seoane, Susana 
dc.contributor.authorTaboada Palomares, Ángela 
dc.contributor.authorFernández García, Víctor
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Guisuraga, José Manuel
dc.contributor.authorFernández Manso, Alfonso 
dc.contributor.authorQuintano Pastor, Carmen
dc.contributor.authorMarcos Porras, Elena María 
dc.contributor.authorCalvo Galván, María Leonor 
dc.contributor.otherEcologiaes_ES
dc.date2019-06-20
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-01T00:17:39Z
dc.date.available2019-11-01T00:17:39Z
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Wildland Fire, 2019, vol. 28, n. 7es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1049-8001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10612/11275
dc.descriptionP. 512-520es_ES
dc.description.abstractThis study analyses the suitability of remote sensing data from different sources (Landsat 7 ETM+, MODIS and Meteosat) in evaluating the effect of fuel conditions on fire severity, using a megafire (11 891 ha) that occurred in a Mediterranean pine forest ecosystem (NW Spain) between 19 and 22 August 2012. Fire severity was measured via the delta Normalized Burn Ratio index. Fuel conditions were evaluated through biophysical variables of: (i) the Visible Atmospherically Resistant Index and mean actual evapotranspiration, as proxies of potential live fuel amount; and (ii) Land Surface Temperature and water deficit, as proxies of fuel moisture content. Relationships between fuel conditions and fire severity were evaluated using Random Forest models. Biophysical variables explained 40% of the variance. The Visible Atmospherically Resistant Index was the most important predictor, being positively associated with fire severity. Evapotranspiration also positively influenced severity, although its importance was conditioned by the data source. Live fuel amount, rather than fuel moisture content, primarily affected fire severity. Nevertheless, an increase in water deficit and land surface temperature was generally associated with greater fire severity. This study highlights that fuel conditions largely determine fire severity, providing useful information for defining pre-fire actions aimed at reducing fire effects.es_ES
dc.languageenges_ES
dc.publisherCSIROes_ES
dc.subjectEcología. Medio ambientees_ES
dc.subject.otherEvapotranspirationes_ES
dc.subject.otherFire effectses_ES
dc.subject.otherLandsates_ES
dc.subject.otherMeteosates_ES
dc.subject.otherMODISes_ES
dc.subject.otherVARI indexes_ES
dc.titleAssessment of the influence of biophysical properties related to fuel conditions on fire severity using remote sensing techniques: a case study on a large fire in NW Spaines_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/preprintes_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1071/WF18156
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.journal.titleInternational Journal of Wildland Firees_ES
dc.volume.number28es_ES
dc.issue.number7es_ES
dc.page.initial512es_ES
dc.page.final520es_ES
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/submittedVersiones_ES


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